[ eBook ] RedeploymentAuthor Phil Klay – Circuitwiringdiagram.co

Phil Klay s Redeployment takes readers to the frontlines of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, asking us to understand what happened there, and what happened to the soldiers who returned Interwoven with themes of brutality and faith, guilt and fear, helplessness and survival, the characters in these stories struggle to make meaning out of chaos In Redeployment , a soldier who has had to shoot dogs because they were eating human corpses must learn what it is like to return to domestic life in suburbia, surrounded by people who have no idea where Fallujah is, where three members of your platoon died In After Action Report , a Lance Corporal seeks expiation for a killing he didn t commit, in order that his best friend will be unburdened A Morturary Affairs Marine tells about his experiences collecting remains of US and Iraqi soldiers both A chaplain sees his understanding of Christianity, and his ability to provide solace through religion, tested by the actions of a ferocious Colonel And in the darkly comic Money as a Weapons System , a young Foreign Service Officer is given the absurd task of helping Iraqis improve their lives by teaching them to play baseball These stories reveal the intricate combination of monotony, bureaucracy, comradeship and violence that make up a soldier s daily life at war, and the isolation, remorse, and despair that can accompany a soldier s homecoming Redeployment is poised to become a classic in the tradition of war writing Across nations and continents, Klay sets in devastating relief the two worlds a soldier inhabits one of extremes and one of loss Written with a hard eyed realism and stunning emotional depth, this work marks Phil Klay as one of the most talented new voices of his generation In Redeployment, Phil Klay, a former Marine who served in Iraq, grapples with a different war but aims for a similar effect showing us the myriad human manifestations that result from the collision of young, heavily armed Americans with a fractured and deeply foreign country that very few of them even remotely understand Klay succeeds brilliantly, capturing on an intimate scale the ways in which the war in Iraq evoked a unique array of emotion, predicament and heartbreak In Klay s hands, I In Redeployment, Phil Klay, a former Marine who served in Iraq, grapples with a different war but aims for a similar effect showing us the myriad human manifestations that result from the collision of young, heavily armed Americans with a fractured and deeply foreign country that very few of them even remotely understand Klay succeeds brilliantly, capturing on an intimate scale the ways in which the war in Iraq evoked a unique array of emotion, predicament and heartbreak In Klay s hands, Iraq comes across not merely as a theater of war but as a laboratory for the human condition in extremis Redeployment is hilarious, biting, whipsawing and sad It s the best thing written so far on what the war did to people s souls Dexter Filkins The New York Times Book ReviewDeep down, I was secretly rooting for Emily St John Mandel s Station Eleven but when the National Book Award for fiction was awarded to Phil Klay for Redeployment , which I was almost done reading, I smiled with gratitude and approval When Phil Klay walked up on stage and started reading his notes for his acceptance speech, the myriad of emotions running across his face, which he painstakingly tried to subdue, held the audience captive from the first word to the last.I cannot do justice to this collection of stories They are the most brutally honest, unflinchingly raw and morally complex accounts of what the Irak and Afghanistan wars did to the minds and bodies of the most innocent, the most naive and the bravest of all of us the soldiers and Marines who served and still serve over there Whether or not you supported or understood these wars, you cannot not feel an extraordinary sense of empathy for these young men and women thrown into the pits of hell and expected to come out unscathed.I will leave the last words to him, from his incredible essay After War, a Failure of the Imagination , published in the New York Times earlier this year It s a powerful moment, when you discover a vocabulary exists for something you d thought incommunicably unique Personally, I felt it reading Joseph Conrad s Lord Jim I have friends who ve found themselves described in everything from science fiction to detective novels This self recognition through others is not simply a by product of art it s the whole point Hegel once wrote, The nature of humanity is to drive men to agreement with one another, and humanity s existence lies only in the commonality of consciousness that has been brought about To enter into that commonality of consciousness, though, veterans need an audience that is both receptive and critical Believing war is beyond words is an abrogation of responsibility it lets civilians off the hook from trying to understand, and veterans off the hook from needing to explain You don t honor someone by telling them, I can never imagine what you ve been through Instead, listen to their story and try to imagine being in it, no matter how hard or uncomfortable that feels If the past 10 years have taught us anything, it s that in the age of an all volunteer military, it is far too easy for Americans to send soldiers on deployment after deployment without making a serious effort to imagine what that means We can do better The essay can be read in its entirety here then you can rush and get a copy of this superb collection of stories Realism is masterfully achieved in this collection of short stories All the short stories are alike in the theme of our modern war They re told with anecdotal precision in modern vernacular, so it is never boring All of them are written in the first person POV, which makes the entire workpersonal Bottom line It really is one important read Irritating Annoying Draining Wayyyyyyy too much profanity The in house jargon, acronyms , were absurd I m not familiar with complex military terminology Much of this audible came off feeling like ramblings It wasn t easy to difficult to follow This wasn t a book I was dying to read making things clear upfront however, it s the new chosen pick for my local book club.so I was game I downloaded this book from my library on my over drive app and started listening AWFUL ju Irritating Annoying Draining Wayyyyyyy too much profanity The in house jargon, acronyms , were absurd I m not familiar with complex military terminology Much of this audible came off feeling like ramblings It wasn t easy to difficult to follow This wasn t a book I was dying to read making things clear upfront however, it s the new chosen pick for my local book club.so I was game I downloaded this book from my library on my over drive app and started listening AWFUL just plain awful People really took value away from this book No me I felt like I was being talked to to death When the narrators were not saying fuckand Bullshit their stories were choppy descriptions and short sentences All the stories felt repetitive and the characters similar I get it..these guys were messed up by war clear I can t for the life of me understand why this book won the National Book awardand I don t understand all the high ratings I know what I listened to I wouldn t consider this a classic war book at all But if readers got value and the author felt some grief relief then great, butI already learned with the Vietnam war how horrific war isyoung men severely damaged, the complete waste war is I found this book too tiresome to listen to and too much cuirsing and sarcasm Nope no Thank You In these dozen stories, Klay draws from his own experience as a U.S Marine captain to give us one of the most compelling depictions to date of the Iraq war, and especially of the psychic toll it continues to exact on those who fought in it In this regard, Redeployment will inevitably draw comparisons to The Things They Carried 1990 , Tim O Brien s masterful evocation of the Vietnam War Somewhat remarkably, given Klay s age he s only 30 and his admittedly mild deployment in Iraq one de In these dozen stories, Klay draws from his own experience as a U.S Marine captain to give us one of the most compelling depictions to date of the Iraq war, and especially of the psychic toll it continues to exact on those who fought in it In this regard, Redeployment will inevitably draw comparisons to The Things They Carried 1990 , Tim O Brien s masterful evocation of the Vietnam War Somewhat remarkably, given Klay s age he s only 30 and his admittedly mild deployment in Iraq one defined mostly, he has written, by long hours at a cheap plywood desk in a cheap plywood hut , the comparison is apt Have you been seeking the Tim O Brien or the Joseph Heller or the Erich Maria Remarque for our foray into Iraq Mission accomplished.Read our full review of this extraordinarily powerful debut Veteran s Day November 11thTo all our War Veterans with tremendous appreciation and pride, a heartfelt Thank You for your bravery and steely character not just on the battlefield, but in resuming Life after it There are two ways to tell the story Funny or sad Guys like it funny, with lots of gore and a grin on your face when you get to the end Girls like it sad, with a thousand yard stare out to the distance as you gaze upon the horrors of war they can t quite see Phil Klay Redeployment Veteran s Day November 11thTo all our War Veterans with tremendous appreciation and pride, a heartfelt Thank You for your bravery and steely character not just on the battlefield, but in resuming Life after it There are two ways to tell the story Funny or sad Guys like it funny, with lots of gore and a grin on your face when you get to the end Girls like it sad, with a thousand yard stare out to the distance as you gaze upon the horrors of war they can t quite see Phil Klay RedeploymentThe Iraq conflict is clearly emerging as the war narrative of our country With its highly sophisticated and damaging weaponry, our veterans are left with the intense stories of the ill gotten, complex myriad of physically and psychologically devastating injuries Redeployment is a raw, gut wrenching, dis embowelling short story collection focused on the Marine s tour in Fallujah a window through which to view the Iraq experience from the most important perspective through the eyes of those who served there These vivid portraits detail palpitating combat action in the call of duty, undeniable courage and loyalty to one s fellow soldier intense stories of the war hero, who is sometimes the antihero his disenchantment from the glorified myth that the American soldier went to war and came back all the stronger for the experience the dehumanization effect of war indelibly sketched between the lines the devastating battle wounds and deep psychological scars the shattering impact and permanent damage to both soldiers and civilians lives stories that end in the silent question of the soldier s intact morality and wholesome future In the streets firefights, sniper attacks, gore and guts, gas bloated dead hajji in the sun, unseeing eyes bulging toward the sky It could have been you but he got fucked.Insurgent hiding in the stinking pool of liquid shit, waiting to fire on you as you turn your back You saw him first, so he got fucked.Little Iraqi faces peering out a window, the mother screaming in horror, the fourteen year old kid obliterated by your rifle fire Never mind he was holding an AK, it was either him or you, and he got fucked.You did what you had to do to survive maybe injured civilians in the process Bombs, missiles, IED s, bone shattering rounds, torture, scattered limbs, seared flesh You survived, but you still got fucked.Home now No sleep When it fitfully comes, you return to the battlefield in dreams and odd memoriesWhen I thought back on it, there were the memories I had, and the stories I told, and they sort of sat together in my mind, the stories becoming stronger every time I retold them, feelingandtrueWounds too deep, so much pain, it hurts too muchA human being in enough pain is just a screaming animal No one comes home from the war unchanged.On coming home, did our governmental institution expect it to be a calm and easy transition into the after life for you You re now an unemployed or unemployable war vet have they nonchalantly condemned you to subsist on the inevitable artificial life support of Disability or the stuporous numbness of perpetual inadequate medical management Phil Klay noticeably avoids taking political positions that would have interfered with his true purpose the human experience of the war itself Quite frankly, too many troops did not fully grasp why they were even there Klay contrasts the gravity of this war of ambiguous missions, with the injection of some levity, for example revealing the farcical projects like building irrelevant, flawed infrastructure or the circumlocution in providing medical care and jobs for Iraqi women still in an oppressed society based on their religion Klay s writing is powerful and compelling, most of all, realistic I can t recommend this book highly enough Redeployment might probably become a modern war classic In any event, it has my vote If I had to sum up my feelings about this book in one word, could I do that What word would I choose to describe this stunning collection of short stories Thought provoking, perfect, intense, brutal, authentic, raw, heartbreaking, honest, hard to read, brilliant, unforgettableluckily, I don t have to describe this in a word because quite frankly, I don t think I could I m supposed to be reading All The Light We Cannot See the 28 day library loan that is due back in three days but I picke If I had to sum up my feelings about this book in one word, could I do that What word would I choose to describe this stunning collection of short stories Thought provoking, perfect, intense, brutal, authentic, raw, heartbreaking, honest, hard to read, brilliant, unforgettableluckily, I don t have to describe this in a word because quite frankly, I don t think I could I m supposed to be reading All The Light We Cannot See the 28 day library loan that is due back in three days but I picked up Redeployment and I didn t want to put it down I m not a fan of short stories and might not have read this book had I realized it was a collection, but it grabbed me with the first sentence and never let go Each story covers a different aspect of the Iraq War, with each voice very distinct Each story is a work of art The writing is beautiful and flawless This fiction is very real TheI write, theI realize that I cannot properly review this book having just finished it My nerves are still jangled, my emotions twisted, my heart broken I have tremendous, undying daily respect for every member of our military This book is a brutally honest look at war that would be a difficult read for many, but it is an important work that I wish everyone would read Outstanding Believing war is beyond words is an abrogation of responsibility it lets civilians off the hook from trying to understand, and veterans off the hook from needing to explain You don t honor someone by telling them, I can never imagine what you ve been through Instead, listen to their story and try to imagine being in it, no matter how hard or uncomfortable that feels If the past 10 years have taught us anything, it s that in the age of an all volunteer military, it is far too easy for Ame Believing war is beyond words is an abrogation of responsibility it lets civilians off the hook from trying to understand, and veterans off the hook from needing to explain You don t honor someone by telling them, I can never imagine what you ve been through Instead, listen to their story and try to imagine being in it, no matter how hard or uncomfortable that feels If the past 10 years have taught us anything, it s that in the age of an all volunteer military, it is far too easy for Americans to send soldiers on deployment after deployment without making a serious effort to imagine what that means We can do better After War, a Failure of the Imagination, By PHIL KLAY New York Times Sunday Review FEB 8, 2014In his searing collection, Redeployment, winner of the 2014 National Book Award, Phil Klay strips the wartime experience of everything that makes us congratulate ourselves for our nation s bravery, dispels any romantic notion we have of soldiers in combat, and empties our hearts of hope that we have not done grave, even irreparable, damage to the bodies and minds of these young men and women We shot dogs Not by accident We did it on purpose, and we called it Operation Scooby I m a dog person, so I thought about that a lot And so opens Redeployment, with its eponymous story The collection offers voices of men, nearly all Marines, some speaking from home, others still in Iraq each offering a distinct and visceral reflection of his war experience There is the adrenaline rush of combat, rife with acronyms and Oo rahs, fuck and blood in Frago, Ten Kliks South, andAfter Action Report The latter shows how missions can be twisted and misremembered, as one soldier claims responsibility for something he did not do to spare a buddy the consequences of truth But the consequences of war do not spare any of the soldiers The stories of veterans returned home affected me the most, for it is here that our failure of these volunteers is the starkest The training for war is planned and executed with precision the plan for the soldiers once they no longer have a leader and a mission is almost non existent and their emotional wounds are left to fester The young man in Bodies collected the bodies of the dead not only was he an outcast in war, the lowest member of the military caste system, but he returns home to a girlfriend who rejects him for having enlisted in the first place He belongs nowhere, and his loneliness is crushing The black humor between two friends in War Stories is painful and tender one young man is so disfigured from his burn wounds, he and his buddy both know he won t win even a pity fuck from the ugly girls in the bar Money as a Weapons System is a window into the surreal Who s on first world of government bureaucracy, as told by a baffled Foreign Service Officer Prayer in the Furnace is the author at his most tender and philosophical, writing in the voice of a chaplain who believes he has knowledge of war crimes His attempts to bring the transgressions to the attention of those in authority and his attempts to bring God to the attention of the soldiers force the reader to reconsider morality and judgment There s a perversity in me that, when I talk to conservatives, makes me want to bash the war and, when I talk to liberals, defend it That s how an Iraq veteran, now student at Amherst, explains his ambivalence about his service His story takes a twist he s a Copt an Egyptian Christian who grew up in the shadow of 9 11 As America deepened its mistrust of anyone who looks Middle Eastern the underlying assumption being that Middle Eastern Muslim Enemy his father became a gung ho Fox News conservative to deal with the prejudice His son joined the military in a perverse need to both please and hurt his father What elevates these stories above voyeurism and shock value is Phil Klay s pitch perfect writing His ear for dialogue, his eye for detail offering just enough poetry in his prose to seduce, but not to saturate and the immediacy and emotion of his characters voices reveal the power this young writer wields in his pen These are masterfully crafted stories of war, walking in the same footsteps as Tim O Brien, Ernest Hemingway, and Wilfred Owen before him, but with a vision all his own.As I write this review, the Senate Intelligence Committee is at long last issuing a report on the Central Intelligence Agency s program to detain and interrogate terrorism suspects in the years after the Sept 11 attacks The report is a damning indictment on the techniques used by the C.I.A techniques the report identifies as torture Former Vice President Dick Cheney is already spinning away, calling these enhanced interrogation techniques lawful and justified After all, these were members of the Axis of Evil, determined to undermine peace, justice, and the merricun way.I wonder if any of the men and women who made the decision to lead our country into war with Iraq has the courage to read Phil Klay s Redeployment I wonder if any of these politicians has the courage to understand what their war has done to the soldiers who volunteered to serve in their nameIf the past 10 years have taught us anything, it s that in the age of an all volunteer military, it is far too easy for Americans to send soldiers on deployment after deployment without making a serious effort to imagine what that means We can do betterPhil Klay The writing here is excellent and this offers a necessary look at war and its effects but there is a sameness across the stories that I didn t love By the end of the book, not one character was distinct in my mind. For those of you keeping score American Sniper 1 star Redeployment 5 stars Redeployment is everything you want in a war book, an unflinching look at the disconnect between the people fighting and the country sending them to fight It s smart in every way that American Sniper is over simplistic, showcasing the ins and outs of war with sensitivity and nuance whereas American Sniper practically screams F yeah Let s killsavages in the name of freedom While fiction, the voi For those of you keeping score American Sniper 1 star Redeployment 5 stars Redeployment is everything you want in a war book, an unflinching look at the disconnect between the people fighting and the country sending them to fight It s smart in every way that American Sniper is over simplistic, showcasing the ins and outs of war with sensitivity and nuance whereas American Sniper practically screams F yeah Let s killsavages in the name of freedom While fiction, the voices resonate withtruth than the autobiography of our most lethal sniper this is the Iraq war told through many different lenses forming acomprehensive picture of the war experience