[[ pdf ]] No Easy Day: The Firsthand Account of the Mission That Killed Osama Bin LadenAuthor Mark Owen – Circuitwiringdiagram.co

After finishing the book, I can honestly say that there was nothing revealed in this book, that I haven t already seen on the History channel a dozen times The person who revealed the details to the mission, was our own President and his band of merry minions I know the SEALs have a code about not discussing their work, but I m curious as to what the expiration date on that silence is Many SEALs have told their stories in books and never garnered such negative reactions.The book is very inter After finishing the book, I can honestly say that there was nothing revealed in this book, that I haven t already seen on the History channel a dozen times The person who revealed the details to the mission, was our own President and his band of merry minions I know the SEALs have a code about not discussing their work, but I m curious as to what the expiration date on that silence is Many SEALs have told their stories in books and never garnered such negative reactions.The book is very interesting reading, well written, and a tribute to the all the men and women who worked so hard to capture Bin Laden A shout out to the female CIA analyst who tracked him for ten years I am grateful to the author for coming forward, and telling us the truth I will always believe a SEAL over a politician If the author broke his code of honor, that s between him, his conscience, and the SEALs I think it was a lot of hype If the government had really wanted this book off the shelves, it would be off the shelves.If you like this type of book, it s really worth reading Many may disagree with this book being written, with Matt Bissonnette breaking his oath of secrecy as a Seal and a member of the US Armed Forces I am in no doubt that he has indeed done so He has publicly stated, and does so in the book, that his reasons are first and foremost that he felt such an important mission should be documented and in the public domain He knew he would catch a lot of flack for it He decided to sacrifice his own honor for the public good the good of reminding all of Many may disagree with this book being written, with Matt Bissonnette breaking his oath of secrecy as a Seal and a member of the US Armed Forces I am in no doubt that he has indeed done so He has publicly stated, and does so in the book, that his reasons are first and foremost that he felt such an important mission should be documented and in the public domain He knew he would catch a lot of flack for it He decided to sacrifice his own honor for the public good the good of reminding all of us the work these men and woman do and the sacrifices they have to make themselves, over and over again, because they believe in a higher purpose I believe they are role models for that reason I agree with him I feel this story does indeed deserve to be in the public domain To be a part of the public written record of a significant part of our recent history I found it very doubtful the book and its contents present any kind of security risk to US policy and personnel There is nothing in the book that was not already well known and understood about how the US special forces operate, anyone who likes to read about this kind of thing understands this And I take him at his word this this is his primary motive His heart seems to be in the right place If anything, the way he has spoken about his book, he sometimes comes across as a little naive, which I find blameless This is not a complicated man to understand Those who are going out of their way seeking anterior motives for his betrayal might well be wasting their time To quote Hitchens It is a frequent vice of radical polemic to assert, and even to believe, that once you have found the lowest motive for an antagonist, you have identified the correct one sic The presentation of the events in the book is pretty matter of fact A lot of it is told in flashback form, with looparounds and digressions until we come back to the actual mission Much of the book covers his relationships to his comrades, and their shared experiences You can tell he has a deep love and loyalty for his friends in the teams, if not always a great respect for the chain of command and the high er ups What surprised me the most is the level of freedom these operators are given to do their jobs Very few regulations relating to their dress, appearance and kit What struck me most is his apparently level headedness You get the feeling he is of a very calm temperament, and so are his colleagues I also got that impression from his interview on 60 minutes see youtube , which prompted me to read the book Bissonnette is not a professional writer, so do not expect all too much from the quality of the writing style However, having said that, I found the book riveting and hard to put down This is a review of the book, not of the author I feel I have to title my review this way because although I m very glad this event happened, and I have boundless admiration for the people who participated in the raid, including the author, I can t honestly say it was a great book.To be fair to Mark Owen , his ghostwriter, Kevin Maurer, does bear some responsibility for taking a tired, pseudo action thriller approach to the story The first half of the book is a very mediocre, dramatized monta This is a review of the book, not of the author I feel I have to title my review this way because although I m very glad this event happened, and I have boundless admiration for the people who participated in the raid, including the author, I can t honestly say it was a great book.To be fair to Mark Owen , his ghostwriter, Kevin Maurer, does bear some responsibility for taking a tired, pseudo action thriller approach to the story The first half of the book is a very mediocre, dramatized montage approach to what it takes to be a Navy Seal and rise up through the ranks to do the type of special operations detailed in the book As heart pounding action thrillers go, it s lacking in the kind of tangible, humanizing elements that elevate good stories of this kind out of the G.I Joe stereotype The second half of the book deals with the raid itself in a very dry, accurate and factual way It paints a clear picture of the anti climactic demise of Osama Bin Laden It probably would have taken a ghost writer with superior skills to Maurer s to forge the rising anticipation, the fear, the frustrations into agripping read.I need to make it clear that I m not dissing the Navy Seal I m just saying a better ghost writer might have doneto bring his story to life.Many critics have questioned this author s motives for writing the book, and I think the end of the story really exposes them He s clearly not in it for the money since most of the profits from this book are going to veteran s charities I think he s a man who is bitter about the spin the media and the administration gave the killing of Bin Laden, because having been an eye witness to it, he feels the factual truth was good enough and didn t require embellishment But he s also a man, like many in front line positions, who holds tremendous animosity towards anyone with a say in military policy and decision making who isn t sitting beside him in combat gear, holding a firearm I think most people who experience war on the front lines feel this way But it sours the end of the book rather badly Because the author is clearly not a fan of Obama, and says so often and, at times, in disparaging ways This book is a a first hand account of the raid, b a portrait of what these admirable and brave people go through to serve their country and c a concerted effort on the part of the author to deny the present administration any share in the glory of Bin Laden s final demise Note to future administrations If you say you re going to have a beer with the guys you re pinning medals on, you d better keep your promise Otherwise they end up bitter and write books like this one And although I thoroughly commiserate with the author s walk a mile in my shoes feelings, I also think it does damage to the nobility of an account of what was a brave, courageous and well implemented military action I wouldn t want to walk in Owen s shoes, nor would I want to be responsible for making decisions about the fate of a whole country, its security, its economy and its place as superpower I think it may be a central flaw in attempting to write a first person account of this sort of experience too close to the actual event, without the distance of some time and consideration to put the events in proportion There have been some outstanding first person accounts of war, but rarely are they written so soon after the event.Post script Recent information from two completely different investigative reviews of this incident put much of this account under erasure Personally, I have no issue with a fictionalized thriller based on the takedown of OBL, I just require it becompetently written FEW BOOKS HAVE generated as much buzz in as short a time as No Easy Day by Mark Owen, a former Navy SEAL who participated in the mission that killed al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden While media have understandably focused on the bin Laden narrative, and the differences between it and the Obama administration s story of the raid, it s important to note something about this book at the outset While Operation Neptune Spear ONS , the bin Laden mission, is the hook and a singularly effective one FEW BOOKS HAVE generated as much buzz in as short a time as No Easy Day by Mark Owen, a former Navy SEAL who participated in the mission that killed al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden While media have understandably focused on the bin Laden narrative, and the differences between it and the Obama administration s story of the raid, it s important to note something about this book at the outset While Operation Neptune Spear ONS , the bin Laden mission, is the hook and a singularly effective one at that , this is neither a tell all nor a score settling effort, but a military memoir This should be clear from the cover alone though The Firsthand Account of the Mission that Killed Osama bin Laden is emblazoned on the front, the book also boasts the subtitle The Autobiography of a Navy SEAL Owen was not only one of the few men selected to participate in ONS he was in the door on the Black Hawk that crash landed into bin Laden s compound, and directly behind the SEAL who shot the al Qaeda leader on the third floor of his Abbottabad house As such, Owen is in an excellent position to correct the existing narrative and replace it or at least supplement it with his own As a participant, the author hasknowledge of the mission s details and order of events not to mention of his own thought processes and emotions than the administration s storytellers, the anonymous Beltway leakers, or the authors of definitive features on the raid, like The New Yorker s Nicholas Schmindle.IN A STORY like this, the details matter The book s second half is dedicated to ONS and its aftermath, and in that portion of the text Owen reveals some relatively significant details that were not previously known Examples include the use of four MH 47s carrying SEALs two in Jalalabad, two in northern Pakistan to serve as a quick reaction force QRF and forward area refueling and rearming point FARRP on the exfiltration route, the SEALs instruction to use a downed drone as their excuse for being in Pakistani territory if captured, the low quality of the video feed provided by drones that were almost constantly loitering over bin Laden s compound, and an aerial infiltration route that included flying through Indian airspace in order to approach Abbottabad from the southeast Additionally, there is no mention of Stealth Hawk technology draw from that what you will.Perhaps the most noteworthy and oft repeated new information is the author s description of bin Laden s death, and the fact that the al Qaeda leader was unarmed when shot, despite havingthan adequate warning of the Americans presence in his compound As they approached the third level of bin Laden s house, Owen writes, we were less than five steps from getting to the top when I heard the suppressed shots BOP BOP The point man had seen a man peeking out of the door on the right side of the hallway about ten feet in front of him I couldn t tell from my position if the rounds hit the target or not The man disappeared into the dark room It turned out they both impacted the right side of bin Laden s head Following this, Owen entered bin Laden s room just behind the point man, who, he writes, grabbed two women standing over bin Laden s body and drove them toward the corner of the room If either woman had on a suicide vest, he writes, he probably saved our lives, but it would have cost him his own It was a selfless decision made in a split second Once the women were clear, severalrounds were fired into the twitching bin Laden s torso.While conducting sensitive site exploitation SSE on the objective, Owen found a shelf just above the door bin Laden had been looking out of when he was killed I slid my hand up and felt two guns, which turned out to be an AK 47 and a Makarov pistol I took each weapon down and pulled out the magazine and checked the chambers.They were both empty.He hadn t even prepared a defense He had no intention of fighting He asked his followers for decades to wear suicide vests or fly planes into buildings, but didn t even pick up his weapon Bin Laden knew we were coming when he heard the helicopter I hadrespect for bin Laden courier and first enemy killed in action, or EKIA, on the objective Ahmed al Kuwaiti in the guest house because at least he tried to defend himself and his family Bin Laden hadtime to prepare than the others, and yet he still didn t do anything Of all the divergences from the Washington narrative on ONS present in No Easy Day, bin Laden s death and his being unarmed at the time is the most significant, particularly because of the criticisms it will engender from armchair commentators who have never cleared a building or had to decide in an instant whether or not a head poking out of a dark room was attached to an armed body Owen specifically recounts a government lawyer from either the Department of Defense or the White House responding to an operator s questionabout whether or not this was a kill mission by ma king it clear this wasn t an assassination However, by both including that and describing bin Laden s death so matter of factly, Owen clearly communicates that, in his mind at least, there is no contradiction between the lawyer s guidance and the team s actions.AS AN AUTOBIOGRAPHY, No Easy Day is lacking a few references are made to the author s youth in Alaska, one page is given to his decision influenced by his missionary father to put off Navy service for four years in favor of attending college, and his time in SEAL Team Five is briefly acknowledged, but for all intents and purposes, Owen s story begins with his tryout for the Naval Special Warfare Development Group DEVGRU, or SEAL Team Six and his time as a trainee on the unit s Green Team While not a true autobiography which would be difficult to produce while writing under a pseudonym , though, as a military memoir the book has a great deal to offer Training, team life, and the bond between operators is effectively described, and the operations Owen chooses to include are vividly recounted, providing a feeling of being on the scene while remaining true to his desire to protect identities and to protect the tactics, techniques, and procedures TTPs used by the teams as they wage a daily battle against terrorists and insurgents This was likely a very difficult tightrope to walk, but Owen was largely able to live up to the warning he issues the reader at the very beginning If you are looking for secrets, this is not your book Owen further notes that a former Special Operations attorney was consulted to ensure that the book was free from mention of forbidden topics and that it cannot be used by sophisticated enemies as a source of sensitive information to compromise or harm the United States As noted above, while TTPs are necessarily mentioned in the narrative, they are painted with a very broad brush General evolutions in the team s tactics are mentioned examples include adapting raid infiltration methods from Flying to the X arriving directly at a target building to landing over the horizon from the target area and quietly patrolling in, and exercising throttle control moving slowly, quietly, and deliberately through an objective rather than moving at a constant sprint In Owen s words, We were transitioning from being loud and fast, taking the enemy by surprise, to being soft and slow and retaining the element of surprise for even longer However, these details should not be seen as either secret enough or sensitive enough to compromise operational security in the present or future.Despite the care taken not to disclose sensitive information, though, Owen has been notified by the Department of Defense that he is in material breach and violation of the non disclosure agreements NDAs he signed both as a member of, and when leaving, the Navy The real motivation behind this can only be guessed at Owen s contradiction of the Obama administration s leaked accounts of the raid His decision not to go through normal DoD channels for pre publication review and approval , but it is a real issue, and how it plays out could very well set a precedent for future actions by potential authors and DoD attorneys alike.NAVY SEALS HAVE been in the news, in print, and on televisions and movie screens for several years now In the early 2000s, Discovery Channel followed Basic Underwater Demolition SEAL BUD S class 234 through training, and earlier this year the movie Act of Valor , starring active duty SEALs, was released in theaters and on DVD Additionally, memoirs by former Navy SEALs like Chris Kyle, Marcus Luttrell, and Brandon Webb have sold thousands of copies to a general public that is hungry for stories of strength and heroism from our current long war What makes No Easy Day different from these The answer is both simple and complex First, television programs like Navy SEALs BUD S Class 234 and the film Act of Valor had the approval of, and direct support from, the Navy and the Department of Defense No Easy Day,on the other hand, was published very quickly sixteen months after Operation Neptune Spear took place, and was released without the manuscript having been submitted for DoD review Other military memoirs, like Webb s excellent The Red Circle, have been written without Pentagon review and approval, but the events described within those are less current and less of a lightning rod for attention and controversy than the bin Laden raid.Second, BUD S training is not classified, and even the operators and exercises filmed in Act of Valor as well as the authors of, and the operations described in, the aforementioned memoirs came from the realm of white SOF DEVGRU, on the other hand, comes from the intentionallyshadowy world of black SOF, where it and the rest of JSOC s Tier 1 special mission units, and mission support units, reside That fact alone makes No Easy Day a different, and muchsensitive, case.There is no question that, by the letter of the law, the Pentagon has a case against Owen All JSOC personnel sign NDAs when I was there, it was a standard 70 year agreement , so simply by writing this memoir, and including information about JSOC and its operations, Owen almost certainly violated that document Additionally, despite having been in the public sphere for many, many years, just the names SEAL Team Six and Delta Force, both of which are mentioned in concert with personnel and operations within Owen s book, are classified, as are many details about them These legal issues aren t the only problems Owen is likely to face America s Tier 1 warfighters have long been known as notoriously quiet professionals, and, as former Delta Force officer Dalton Fury recently noted, writing about a unit and its exploits is enough to earn a former operator the status of persona non grata within the community.IN THE PORTION of the book concerned with the aftermath of the raid, Owen describes the concern and frustration he and his teammates had with the geyser of leaks about the unit and the mission In Washington, he writes, anyone on Capitol Hill or in the Pentagon who had even a shred of information was leaking it This, of course, extended to the White House, where National Security Adviser Tom Donilan had to be told by then Secretary of Defense Robert Gates to Shut the expletive up about the raid In his epilogue, Owen writes of the notoriety that came after ONS We watched it with amusement at first, but that quickly turned to dread asandinformation leaked While it may seem odd to express concern about leaks in an unapproved book, Owen excuses or rationalizes the contradiction by expressing his belief in the need to set the record straight about the mission, which he says has been reported like a bad action movieeven in reports claiming to have the inside story, because the story of the men at the command who willingly go into harm s way, sacrificing all they have to do the jobis a story that deserves to be told, and told as accurately as possible Contrary to how some media outlets have reported on it, No Easy Day is not an anti Obama book, and it does not read like a work conceived out of animus toward the current administration In fact, the majority of the frustration expressed within its pages aside from that saved for those leaking to the press about ONS is directed at what Owen saw as ever tightening rules of engagement in Afghanistan, which forced the unit to ignore the all of the lessons we had learned, especially those learned in blood, and which made operators feel like we were fighting the war with one hand and filling out paperwork with the other While Owen and his teammates are clearly not Obama supporters and he aptly describes Vice President Biden as someone s drunken uncle at Christmas dinner , he acknowledges without grudge that they respected Obama as the commander in chief of the military and for giving us the green light on the mission He likewise offers no criticism of Obama s address to the nation on the night of May 1, 2011 Though the president did take the disproportionate amount of credit for the mission that Owen and his teammates expected him to, he writes, We d expected him to give away detailsBut I didn t think his speech was bad at all If anything, it was kind of anticlimactic In defense of his decision to write No Easy Day, Owen notes that everyone from President Obama to Admiral McRaven has given interviews about the operation, a fact which makes him feel comfortable doing the same The obvious difference, of course, is that both the Obama and McRaven are in a position to receive or to dictate guidance on what should and should not be disclosed The downside to this reality, of course, is that those who conducted the mission are in a significantly weaker position than their superiors when it comes to creating and maintaining the narrative of events, even if the one being told by Obama, Donilan, and others lacks accuracy The consequences of stepping out of line on that matter, of directly contradicting Washington s narrative of events regarding Operation Neptune Spear, and of writing about his former unit are something Owen will have to live with, now and in the future Just what those consequences will be particularly in the legal and policy realm will determine just how much of a precedent Owen s book sets for future would be writers.NO EASY DAY is engaging and immensely readable Even if the prose is stilted or repetitive at times for example, conversations are rendered awkwardly due to a lack of contractions, and the word fighters, used to refer to the enemy in Iraq and Afghanistan, appears four times in a six sentence span on two separate occasions, as well as four times in a two page span and eight times in a six page span elsewhere , the stories Owen tells are interesting enough, and the narrative flows well enough, to make such complaints minor at best In his introduction, Owen, who himself was inspired at age 13 to become a SEAL by another veteran s memoir, writes of his hope that one day a young man in junior high school will read No Easy Day and become a SEAL, or at least live a life bigger than him While it is unlikely to provide the sustained controversy many in the media have sought within its covers, No Easy Day will engage a great many readers, and is almost certain to inspire manyand, in Owen s mind at least, If that happens, the book is a success No Easy Day The Firsthand Account of the Mission That Killed Osama Bin Laden, by Mark Owen ISBN 0525953728 336 pages 26.95 , is published by Dutton Despite media reports about his true identity, I refer to the author throughout this review by his chosen pseudonym This review references the Kindle edition of the book, so page numbers are omitted by unfortunate necessity I always enjoy a good book that shows some of the behind the scenes as they relate to historical or political events In this book, the author known as Mark Owen paints a good picture of the life of a Navy SEAL that culminates in the killing of Osama Bin Laden The lead up to its release surely pushed it to the top of the best seller s list, which is solely the fault of the DOD and the Pentagon Let them have their freak out session and quit their bitching It seems as though some within the US I always enjoy a good book that shows some of the behind the scenes as they relate to historical or political events In this book, the author known as Mark Owen paints a good picture of the life of a Navy SEAL that culminates in the killing of Osama Bin Laden The lead up to its release surely pushed it to the top of the best seller s list, which is solely the fault of the DOD and the Pentagon Let them have their freak out session and quit their bitching It seems as though some within the US Government want praise for their actions but are angered when someone peeks behind the black curtain.I get a good chuckle out of those on both sides of the fence who disliked the book Some have said the book was not literary enough and did not go into enough detail To them, I shake my head and ask that they relax and simply enjoy that this book shone light on the event, at all Others particularly in the Defence and Pentagon spheres cry foul that top secret tactics have been revealed Really Seriously The story reads like a good Vince Flynn or Brad Thor novel You really think that the book is a tell all that will keep SEALS from ever doing their job If so, perhaps the Pentagon s tactics are as sophisticated as Luxembourg s Navy Surely Bush leftovers who are control freaks, with as much sense as the only president whose IQ is inferior to his presidential number.I enjoyed what the book was and some of the back story on how a SEAL trains and becomes what he is I still am not convinced that September 11th 2001 was anything but retribution for decades of being cocky That said, the mission that brought Bin Laden to his knees and killed him ought to be enjoyed, not analysed under a microscope The only easy day was yesterday Long live the brotherhood This book is written by Navy SEAL Mark Owen with assistance provided by Kevin Maurer The action discussed is describing what is arguably one of the most influential events of the 21st century The plan to find and assassinate the Western world s most despised real life tyrant Osama Bin Laden The book is written in three sections Mark s youth as a navy SEAL working his way through BUD S training and then his process joining the elite The only easy day was yesterday Long live the brotherhood This book is written by Navy SEAL Mark Owen with assistance provided by Kevin Maurer The action discussed is describing what is arguably one of the most influential events of the 21st century The plan to find and assassinate the Western world s most despised real life tyrant Osama Bin Laden The book is written in three sections Mark s youth as a navy SEAL working his way through BUD S training and then his process joining the elite unit of the squad and counter terrorism unit DEVGRU This part of the book is not that exciting If you have read army or military biographies before then you will know what you are in for in this section.The second section surrounds the internal politics and processes when Mark friends find out that the mission to kill Osama may be forthcoming This part is okay and quite interesting regarding relationships between all the regiments, the CIA, FBI and also the President himself Mark was there so it didn t need to be well researched but he has done a good job showcasing these delicate battle arrangements on these pages and makes us feel as if we were in the room where the discussions were taking place.The 3rd part What every SEAL in the 24 man super team wanted they get the all go from the President to capture or kill target codename Geronimo That s Osama if you weren t sure.This section is where the book really comes into its prime and the reason I envisage the majority of people purchased this text It explains the whole mission intricately all 38 minutes culminating in the death of our villain It doesn t go without a few hick ups however This part was super exciting and isof 4 5 stars in isolation.I don t want to say too much about the story It is very well written Similar to other books like this you feel like you are part of the SEALS at the end as they take us on a journey letting us know all the abbreviations for top secret operations, names of weaponry and also helicopters CH 47 anyone A.k.a The Flying School Bus My only real gripe apart from the first half not being that exciting is that the characters seem to be a device for telling this amazing story rather than enhancing it I didn t feel any real affinity to any of the people involved I imagine, for safety reasons they can t be named therefore are presented as pseudonyms and their family life can t be discussed here but it felt a bit hollow This is different to American Sniper that I read recently where we were allowed insight into his feelings, emotions and views and also family life but in hindsight, this may be because the author of this the book was killed either before or very soon after the book was published I enjoyed this If biographies are your cup of tea there is a lot here to appreciate.To all the true heroes and my friends on Goodreads James x www.youandibooks.wordpress.com I think this is an important book that needs to be read, the same way the Lone Survivor by Marcus Luttrell needs to be read With that said, it started off a little rough for me I felt like I was in a debriefing room, very cold and no depth That changed at the 40% mark and his personality came through I also think you can t say or type this isn t political It s all political no matter the party in the White House.I read this book not so much to read the facts about the mission, I wanted to I think this is an important book that needs to be read, the same way the Lone Survivor by Marcus Luttrell needs to be read With that said, it started off a little rough for me I felt like I was in a debriefing room, very cold and no depth That changed at the 40% mark and his personality came through I also think you can t say or type this isn t political It s all political no matter the party in the White House.I read this book not so much to read the facts about the mission, I wanted to see if Policy changed from the Lone Survivor Unfortunately, that answer is it has gotten worse I have the utmost respect for these men who do a job so much bigger than we could even wrap our brains around I don t know or pretend to know what or if there was a hidden agenda behind his writing of this book and I don t care I m glad he did Thank you I Know the controversy I ve also been on the fence about whether I wanted to read it, but curiosity won What can I say It was a short fence I was captivated by the story and didn t want to put it down In fact, I had just made it to the point where they were about to hit the third floor of the compound when the pilot mentioned we were beginning our final descent and all electronic devices needed to be turned off NOOOOOoOoOOoOoOoOoOo Did I mention it was a three hour flight Yeah Captivate I Know the controversy I ve also been on the fence about whether I wanted to read it, but curiosity won What can I say It was a short fence I was captivated by the story and didn t want to put it down In fact, I had just made it to the point where they were about to hit the third floor of the compound when the pilot mentioned we were beginning our final descent and all electronic devices needed to be turned off NOOOOOoOoOOoOoOoOoOo Did I mention it was a three hour flight Yeah Captivated, I tell you If the book is 100% truth, that s cool If its 100% fabrication, I m disappointed but at the same time, I still enjoyed it I d like to believe its true, especially since the big message staring me in the face at the end of the book was how much of a coward Bin Laden was He was great at rallying those around him to fight to their death, but in the end he gave up without a fight Interesting, but not surprising Of all the books I ve read so far on various aspects of being a SEAL, this was the easiest read as far as language goes It wasn t as technical as other military accounts, so I think it will be easier for people to read I got a good idea of what was going on and the key players without having to reference things or flip through pages to make sure I was thinking about the right acronym A quick comment about some other reviews that kind of surprised me without getting TOO political 1 why are people surprised that an elite military force dislikes the idea of a president who is hellbent on reducing military spending translates to loss of jobs and equipment to run missions like these using this mission to his advantage possible reelection 2 I also don t understand why people had an issue with hearing some of the other missions that showed the training and style of warfare that the SEALs excel at Maybe it was reading other military books that helped me appreciate these anecdotes rather than the expectation of just getting into the story, but if this is the only book you ve read about SEAL missions, isn t the background helpful to understand their MO A quick, unimpressive read from a literary point of view Nearly half the book covers events loosely or not related to the Usama bin Laden UBL mission If all you want is the account of the preparation for and execution of the raid on Bin Laden s compound, you can start roughly halfway through the book and not miss anything specifically pertinent The narrative with regard to the raid that killed UBL, as a first hand account of the events is enlightening in its contradictions to some of the ma A quick, unimpressive read from a literary point of view Nearly half the book covers events loosely or not related to the Usama bin Laden UBL mission If all you want is the account of the preparation for and execution of the raid on Bin Laden s compound, you can start roughly halfway through the book and not miss anything specifically pertinent The narrative with regard to the raid that killed UBL, as a first hand account of the events is enlightening in its contradictions to some of the major details of the official reports released to the media by the DoD and administration in the hours and days immediately after the killing of bin Laden Specific important discrepancies involve the details of the 40 minute gun battle between the SEAL team and those within UBL s compound Assuming Matt Bissonnette s eyewitness account, written under the pseudonym Mark Owen, is factual, perhaps its greatest value is that it reveals yet another manipulation of the media and the truth by yet another administrationinterested in perception than truth Do not get me wrong I do not have a problem with the conduct of the raid that killed UBL as described by Mr Bissonnette BinLaden got what he deserved I take no issue whether he and his protectors put up a defensive gun battle or not, and I have no issue with the SEAL team killing him on sight armed or not Doing so spared the world what would have been a long drawn out political and legal spectacle not unlike the capture, trial, and execution of Saddam Hussein What I do have issues with are in the DoD s and Administration s apparent willingness to deceive and alter facts, presumably for diplomatic reasons I am not naive, I understand the political motivation, especially from an international perspective that drives altering the facts Americans aren t supposed to gun down unarmed criminals or our war time enemies So the official story carried by the media was edited to portray UBL s killing as unavoidable I have to believe that Bissonette s and the publishers motivation for releasing the story without first submitting it to the DoD for scrutinization to ensure that no classified information or operational secrets were divulged, was that he knew the truth he wanted to tell would not have survived their review Not a great book by any means, but important both from the perspective of getting out the real story and for documenting again the heroic work our dedicated military, DoD civilian, and DoD contractor men and women do every day for us and in our name as Americans From the streets of Iraq to the rescue of Captain Richard Phillips in the Indian Ocean, and from the mountaintops of Afghanistan to the third floor of Osama Bin Laden s compound, operator Mark Owen of the US Naval Special Warfare Development Group commonly known as SEAL Team Six has been a part of some of the most memorable special operations in history, as well as countless missions that never made headlines No Easy Day puts readers alongside Owen and the other handpicked members of the twenty four man team as they train for the biggest mission of their lives The blow by blow narrative of the assault, beginning with the helicopter crash that could have ended Owen s life straight through to the radio call confirming Bin Laden s death, is an essential piece of modern historyIn No Easy Day, Owen also takes readers onto the field of battle in America s ongoing War on Terror and details the selection and training process for one of the most elite units in the military Owen s story draws on his youth in Alaska and describes the SEALs quest to challenge themselves at the highest levels of physical and mental endurance With boots on the ground detail, Owen describes numerous previously unreported missions that illustrate the life and work of a SEAL and the evolution of the team after the events of SeptemberIn telling the true story of the SEALs whose talents, skills, experiences, and exceptional sacrifices led to one of the greatest victories in the War on Terror, Mark Owen honors the men who risk everything for our country, and he leaves readers with a deep understanding of the warriors who keep America safe