{Free Reading} Americanized: Rebel Without a Green CardAuthor Sara Saedi – Circuitwiringdiagram.co

In development as a television series from Reese Witherspoon s Hello Sunshine production company and ABC Studios The hilarious, poignant, and true story of one teen s experience growing up in America as an undocumented immigrant from the Middle East, perfect for fans of Mindy Kaling and Trevor Noah s books Very funny but never flippant, Saedi mixes s pop culture references, adolescent angst and Iranian history into an intimate, informative narrative that thoroughly defies current divisive view on immigration The New York Times At thirteen, bright eyed, straight A student Sara Saedi uncovered a terrible family secret she was breaking the law simply by living in the United States Only two years old when her parents fled Iran, she didn t learn of her undocumented status until her older sister wanted to apply for an after school job, but couldn t because she didn t have a Social Security number Fear of deportation kept Sara up at night, but it didn t keep her from being a teenager She desperately wanted a green card, along with clear skin, her own car, and a boyfriend Americanized follows Sara s progress toward getting her green card, but that s only a portion of her experiences as an Iranian American teenager From discovering that her parents secretly divorced to facilitate her mother s green card application to learning how to tame her unibrow, Sara pivots gracefully from the terrifying prospect that she might be kicked out of the country at any time to the almost as terrifying possibility that she might be the only one of her friends without a date to the prom This moving, often hilarious story is for anyone who has ever shared either fear FEATURED ON NPR S FRESH AIRA NYPL BEST BOOK OF THE YEARA CHICAGO PUBLIC LIBRARY BEST OF THE BEST BOOK SELECTIONA SCHOOL LIBRARY JOURNAL BEST BOOK OF THE YEARFOUR STARRED REVIEWS A must read, vitally important memoir Poignant and often LOL funny, Americanized is utterly of the moment Bustle Read Saedi s memoir to push out the poison Teen Vogue A funny, poignant must read for the times we are living in today Pop Sugar


15 thoughts on “Americanized: Rebel Without a Green Card

  1. LAX2NRT LAX2NRT says:

    This is an entertaining and eye opening read It s got the right amount of teenage angst, awkward photos, and cast of warm characters that are screaming for a Netflix series There is also some concrete advice and useful information for immigrants who are currently unsure of their futures This book felt like a both an educational read and a page turning guilty pleasure Plus, I learned I m spiritually Persian because I m always fighting over who gets to pay the check.


  2. I love books I love books says:

    I didn t like the writing


  3. Thomas Edwards Thomas Edwards says:

    Americanized Rebel Without a Green Card is an excellent book, quite enjoyable It reads well and the author recounts her youth growing up in American, discovering at the age of 11 that she was an illegal immigrant, and her and her family s path toward becoming US citizens I am glad she had the chance to share her experience with the world in her memoir I also think of this as an excellent example of parenting by her parents, doing their best to provide her and her sister with opportunities to thrive.


  4. MamaBear MamaBear says:

    Great insights into the teenage life and mindset Set as an immigrant story, it also explains the ups and downs, fears and hopes of all immigrants regardless of origin when settling into this country A great read for 14 years old and up Also recommend for parents wanting to understand the teenager in their house


  5. Josh Wheeler Josh Wheeler says:

    This book is wonderful just for the writing and humor but it selves so deep into the immigrant experience from a young persons view This book brings so many issues to light and quashes many stereotypes of immigrants and undocumented status Such a great read


  6. Erica Meyer Erica Meyer says:

    Insightful and forthright account of growing up undocumented in the Bay Area in the 80s and 90s, and the tremendous lengths it took Sara s family to become citizens A delightful blend of Iranian and American history, pop culture, and engaging personal narrative.


  7. ej ej says:

    Excellent book Funny , informative, interesting and a good read I definitely recommend it.


  8. Patricia A. Patricia A. says:

    I absolutely enjoyed this book Highly recommend it


  9. Daniel Daniel says:

    The book was great sent me the book and it was damaged though But the book is awesome I read it in a day


  10. Samira Saedi Samira Saedi says:

    Timely, hilarious, full of heart Everyone will get something out of this beautifully written memoir.


  11. Kindle Customer Kindle Customer says:

    Book sucked.Not funny.Worst thing I have ever read.Would highly discourage anyone from reading it.


  12. Carol Carol says:

    Wow just wow It s a mess of a memoir that seems to go in circles Now I get that she s picking and choosing from her dairies and memories, but it rambled She also managed to pull of the poor me routine Look each immigrants story is important This book just wasn t forme


  13. SundayAtDusk SundayAtDusk says:

    The description on the back of this book makes it sound like it s going to focus on being an illegal immigrant as a teenager, which makes it sound like it s going to be a mostly serious read Au contraire, this memoir by Sara Saedi reads like it was written by a comedienne While she is quite serious at times, much of the time she is not Much of the time she is humorous and often irreverent In addition, she has no aversion to profanity.Actually, this YA book would best be described as the memories of a teenager growing up in the 1990s The fact she is Iranian makes the story in some ways interesting and different, but it is still filled with loads of 90s adolescent angst acne, wanting a boyfriend and sexual experience, underage drinking, pot smoking, fear of parental disapproval, hanging out with friends and her older sister, not having a prom date, etc.Hence, although the memoir does deal with illegal immigrant status, especially at the end, and the fears associated with that, I would only recommend it to those who want to read extensively about Ms Saedi s not so untypical teenage years in California Or to those who want to read about being the child of Iranian immigrants, and being part of a close knit extended Iranian family Once again, though, while the author s writings of her family and fellow Iranians are often truly loving, they are also often truly irreverent as well as privacy invasive where her parents are concerned Dancing Queen


  14. nashvillegirl nashvillegirl says:

    I loved this breezy memoir of a girl growing up in 1990s California, attempting to balance the life of a normal teenager while dealing with being an illegal immigrant.Saedi s writing style is crisp, clear, and at times, very witty She takes us through life as an Iranian American, including the stories of how her parents met, why they decided to leave Iran, how they brought their children to the U.S., Iranian culture family relationships, food, beliefs about appearances and mannerisms, etc , and the very long and frustrating process of becoming a U.S citizen Intertwined flawlessly though out the story are her memories of growing up as a teenager with problems that many or all teenagers can relate to, such as problematic skin and body parts, sibling issues such as having your younger brother humiliate you in front of your crush , the agony of falling in love with someone who doesn t feel the same way, crushes on movie stars, and watching all her friends get dates for the prom while she worries that she won t get one.I thought the memoir did an excellent job of showing that we re all human, regardless of citizenship status, particularly in an age when there can be an us vs them mentality I also really appreciated how Saedi broke down the immigration process so that anyone can understand it and I hadn t really appreciated just how long it can take someone to complete the application process or that the waiting periods were so long.In full disclosure, I m roughly the same age as Saedi, so I could really relate to the 1990s references, but I think this would be enjoyed by a broad range of people The book is marketed towards younger readers, but again, is something that could easily be enjoyed by older ones.


  15. Just Trying to Help Just Trying to Help says:

    Sara Saedi is a good writer, who is somewhat prolific when you read her bio I did not know this when I picked up her book, I was just intrigued by the title and the basic information But it was clear while I was reading it that she is very talented, the kind of talent that comes from some amount of practice.One of the reasons I had picked up this book is that I had watched the movie Persepolis which has a similar concept in that the author leaves her home country of Iran and lives abroad That movie is based on a graphic novel The comparison really ends there, but it was Persepolis that made me curious to read this book, as one work of art leads to another.Saedi looks at the immigrant situation in a whole new and very American way Saedi s book is far superior and entertaining in its execution If I were to be able to tell my past self where to start, it would be with Saedi s book.In our country, immigration has gone from being a cornerstone of our country s pride to a gambit in a world of political chaos I m pleased that Saedi has written this book This book is not a comedy, and does have its serious moments But as memoirs go, its a fun read.